Planting plants

I just knew I should have taken my camera with me out to check on the lavender babies this evening. They sure are coming along. We’ve got 25 rows in now, with somewhere close to 400 plants in the ground before I ran out of irrigated rows.  There are another 120 plants on the front porch waiting to be tucked in, but Fixer has some trenching to do before then.  Ugh.

While I was out I discovered that watching those plants take off is a lot like watching my daughters grow. Lots of planning before you bring them home, plenty of preparation and reading while you wait on them to arrive. Some trepidation while they grow and a little fear when you tuck them in by themselves for the first time.  But the real comparison is the joy and satisfaction as they start to grow and flower.  I have to admit that I was surprised by the little tingling thrill I got when I stepped out for the first time in three or four days to check progress.

A couple of varieties are sending up spikes and one variety even has a few buds ready to open. It’s kind of hilarious. Our first cutting of lavender is about 4 stems.  I feel like I should cut them and save them for always.

Elsewhere in the garden, our potatoes are going like gang busters. We planted a row of Yukon Gold and a row of Adirondack Blue. They should come ready in September I think.  Also in the ground today are peppers, cukes, garlic, melon, onions, tomatoes.  Our peach trees were pruned aggressively this spring and are now showing a stunning number of buds. We need to consult our orchard expert to find out if and how to thin the buds for bigger fruit.  I think I’m going to be canning a pile this summer.  Ditto for the plum tree. She looks pretty satisfied with herself, too.

The kiwi vine we nearly killed last summer has recovered and is moving toward the espalier wires.  Our vining friends the wisteria, clematis and grapes are all boogying right up their respective trellises, too.  I just can’t seem to get my act together to plant my asparagus, which is a shame because they take several years to establish.  Raspberries are another challenging plant for us.  They still look pretty sorry after a couple of years of disregard and a brutal pruning last year.

I’ve ordered a couple of books on intensive vegetable gardening from Amazon. It’s probably too late for this season to really have a careful plan, but maybe for next year.  Wish us luck!

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